DIVINITY Online Edition

Faculty & Staff

Esther Acolatse led a two-day seminar on “Christian Marriage and Divorce” for about 42 participants at the 2005 Convocation and Pastor School at the divinity school in October. She also gave a lecture on “Care of the Terminally Ill and Their Families: Cross Cultural and Inter- Religious Perspectives” to residents in the clinical pastoral education program at Duke Medical Center.

Teresa Berger published “Women in Worship” in The Oxford History of Christian Worship, edited by Geoffrey Wainwright and Karen Westerfield Tucker, and “Feministische Spiritualität” in Handbuch Theologischer Grundbegriffe, Volume One, edited by Peter Eicher.

In October, Berger moderated a panel on “Religion, Ritual and the Women’s Movement” during the second biennial symposium of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture at Duke University. In November, Berger spoke on the plenary panel during the annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion on “The Future of Religion in the West.”

Jackson Carroll delivered “A Manner of Life Worthy of the Gospel: Exploring the Meaning of Excellent Pastoral Leadership,” the keynote address at an international conference on pastoral leadership at the University of Uppsala in Sweden, Sept. 15-16. On Oct. 30 he gave a lecture in the Bill Jones Lecture Series at Brownson Memorial Presbyterian Church in Southern Pines, N.C., titled “What Can Mainline Churches Learn from Megachurches?” He presented “How Do Pastors Lead, and Does it Matter?” at the annual meeting of the Society for Scientific Study of Religion and Religious Research Association in Rochester, N.Y., Nov. 4-6.

Paul W. Chilcote published Changed from Glory into Glory: Wesleyan Prayer for Transformation with Upper Room Books. His article, “The Fullness of Learning” appeared in A Thoughtful Faith: Cultivating Thinking Theologically, edited by Maxie D. Dunnam and Steve G. W. Moore. “The Witness of Early Methodist Women,” was included in the November issue of Word and Deed: A Journal of Salvation Army Theology and Ministry .

Chilcote delivered “The Spirituality of Early Methodism— Charles Wesley Beyond the Seas: Issues of Inculturation in Wesleyan Mission and Witness” at the Charles Wesley Society Annual Meeting in Teuchelwald, Freudenstadt, Germany, Sept. 30 He gave the annual Wallace Chappell Lecture for the Academy of Evangelism in Theological Education at Wesley Theological Seminary on “The Integral Nature of Worship and Evangelism: Insights from the Wesleyan Tradition,” Oct. 6.

At the Foundation for Evangelism in Lake Junaluska, N.C. he spoke on “The Integral Nature of Worship and Evangelism: Insights from the Wesleyan Tradition,” Oct. 28. Chilcote presided over a panel discussion and provided the response for “Liverpool Hope – Manchester Colloquium on Early Methodism: Texts, Traditions, Theologies,” during the American Academy of Religion in Philadelphia, Nov. 19-22. Nov. 29, he concluded an eight-week series at Orange U.M.C. in Chapel Hill on “Recapturing the Wesleys’Vision.”

James L. Crenshaw published “A Proverb in the Mouth of a Fool” in Seeking out the Wisdom of the Ancients: Essays Offered to Honor Michael V. Fox on the Occasion of the Sixty-fifth Birthday, edited by Ronald L. Troxel, Kevin G. Friebel, and Dennis R. MaGary.

He delivered the lecture “Love, Marriage and Sexuality in the Hebrew Bible,” at Florida Southern University on October 27, and sat on a panel for the same topic October 27-28 with William Countryman, Rose DeAngelo, Ted Jennings and John Carey.

Crenshaw read the papers, “Wisdom Literature in the Global Bible Commentary” and “Ben Sira and Torah” at the Society of Biblical Literature/American Academy of Religion annual meeting in Philadelphia, November 19-22.


Davis

Ellen F. Davis published Wondrous Depth: Preaching the Old Testament with Westminster John Knox in September. During the Convocation and Pastors’ School in October, she gave the Gray Lecture, “Rupture and Reconciliation: Our Covenant with the Land” and taught the seminar “Finding Our Place: Steps toward a Biblical Ecology.”

She presented a workshop of the same title October 15 for the Community of the Holy Spirit in New York City. On November 3, she gave the Dubose Lecture, “The Tabernacle Is Not a Storehouse: Building Sacred Space,” at St. Luke’s School of Theology, Sewanee, Tenn.

Susan Eastman presented “Francis Watson’s Paul and the Hermeneutics of Faith ” as a panelist on the Pauline Epistles section at the Society of Biblical Literature, and as a respondent at the Pauline Soteriology Group on the topic, “The Gospel and the Church in the Letters of Paul.” As a recipient of a grant from the Wabash Center for teaching and learning in theology and religion, she is taking part in the 2005-06 pre-tenure theological school faculty workshop. Her project for this workshop is “From Knowledge to News: Putting Biblical Education to Work in the Life of the Church.”

Amy Laura Hall taught a series on Christian Bioethics for the Trinitarian Class of Trinity United Methodist Church, Durham, and hosted an evening of fellowship for the Divinity Spouses in September. As part of the Introduction to Christian Ethics course Hall hosted members of the New Monasticism movement and participated in a New Monasticism gathering at the Rutba House in Durham in October. She attended a meeting of the United Methodist Bioethics Task Force in Washington, D.C., and presented her research on bioethics to the meeting of the Henry Luce Fellows in Pittsburgh.

At the annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion in November (Philadelphia), Hall participated in a panel on race and adoption and gave a paper entitled “Holy Husbandmen: Virility and Virtue in the ‘Keeping Fit’ Campaign of 1919.”

During December, Hall presented a summary of Conceiving Parenthood to a gathering of the Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, guest lectured in the Theology and Medicine Seminar, and was a featured lecturer at Harvard University Divinity School, presenting “‘Human Mistakes and Mishaps’: Atavism, Accident, and the Century of Progress.” She also directed a children’s Christmas Eve pageant at Trinity U.M.C. based on The Best Christmas Pageant Ever .

At the Annual Meeting of the Society of Christian Ethics in Phoenix, Ariz., in January, Hall was the guest speaker for the Health Care Ethics session, giving a paper on “Defining the Human in Bioethics” and also presented a session paper on the rhetoric of scientific progress during the atomic age.

Hall continues to be active in the Durham CAN effort toward a living wage ordinance in Durham County.


Hauerwas

Stanley M. Hauerwas reviewed “Violence, Hospitality, and the Cross: Reappropriating the Atonement Theory, by Hans Boersma,” in Canadian Evangelical Review . He wrote an entry for “H. Richard Niebuhr” in the third edition of Modern Theologies: An Introduction to Christian Theology Since 1918 and, with Jana Bennette, an entry for “Catholic Social Teaching” in The Oxford Handbook of Theological Ethics.

“Theological Ethics,” written with Sam Wells, appeared in God’s Advocates: Christian Thinkers in Conversation. “Anabaptist Eyes on Biotechnology” ran in Viewing New Creation with Anabaptist Eyes: Ethics of Biotechnology.

“The Writing on the Wall: Resources for Further Reflection,” a review of an article by M.J. Jozzio, was published simultaneously in Journal of Religion, Disability, and Health and End-of-Life Care: Bridging Disability and Aging with Person-Centered Care .

Hauerwas delivered the Luther Lecture at Luther College, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, Sept. 22 and the the Willson Lecture at Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas, Sept. 29. At East Carolina University, in Greenville, N.C., he gave the Jarvis Lecture on Christianity and Culture, Oct. 13.

He participated in the Sermon on the Mount Conference at Wheaton College, Nov. 3, and the Mere Christianity Forum at Furman University, Nov. 14. “The Case for Abolition of War in the 21st Century,” written with Linda Hogan and Enda McDonough appeared in the Fall/ Winter issue of the Journal of Christian Ethics.

Mary McClintock Fulkerson participated in the Feminist Theology Teaching for Change Conference at the Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, Mass., and was named director of the Duke Divinity School certificate program in Gender, Theology and Ministry.

She was awarded a grant from the Wabash Center for teaching and learning in theology and religion for academic year 2005-06 on “Pedagogies of Empowerment in Racially and Ethnically Diverse Classrooms,” and held two workshops for junior faculty and Ph.D. students in September and October on the grant topic.

McClintock Fulkerson took part in the conversation on theology in congregational life at Hartford Seminary during October 11-12. She gave the paper “How I Got Interested in Practice and Context: Confessions of an Unsystematic Theologian” on November 19 at the Association of Practical Theology session at the American Academy of Religion annual meeting.

Reinhard Hütter published “Intellect and Will in the Encyclical Fides et Ratio and in Thomas Aquinas,” in Nova et Vetera 3. He gave a guest lecture, “St. Augustine and St. Thomas on Grace and Freedom in the initium fidei, ” on Oct. 17 at the Institute of Medieval Theology and Philosophy at Boston College.

As the new editor of Pro Ecclesia: A Journal of Catholic and Evangelical Theology, Hütter met with the journal’s associate editors during the annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion. He introduced the new team at the evening reception of the Center for Catholic and Evangelical Theology on November 21.

Emmanuel Katongole published A Future for Africa: Critical Essays in Social Imagination with Brazos Press; “Christianity, Tribalism and the Rwandan Genocide,” in LOGOS 8.3; and “Hauerwasian Hooks and the Social Imagination of the Next Christendom” in God, Truth and Witness: Engaging Stanley Hauerwas, edited by Greg Jones et.al.

He presented the lecture “Pacifism, Politics and Christianity in Africa” for the annual Pacifism and the Christian Tradition lecture series October 2-3 at the Wesley Foundation of Oklahoma State University.

At the University of North Carolina InterVarsity Graduate and Faculty Forum he spoke on “Politics, Violence and Christianity in Africa: On the Resurrection of the Body (Politic).” Katongole read the paper “Embodied and Embodying Hermeneutics of Life in the Academy: Musa Dube’s AIDS Work” on October 11 at the November American Academy of Religion meeting in Philadelphia, Pa. He hosted a panel discussion on “Journeys of Reconciliation” at Duke’s Convocation and Pastors’ School during October.

Katongole, along with Chris Rice, hosted a “vision-casting” meeting for Duke’s new Center for Reconciliation October 9-10 at the divinity school, led a workshop on October 26 titled “Reconciliation as God’s Mission” at the University of Virginia Project of Lived Theology, and led a workshop November 17 on reconciliation at the annual meeting of the Christian Community Development Agents in Indianapolis.

During January, he attended the international academic advisory board meeting at St. Augustine’s College in South Africa.

Katongole’s recent sermons include: “The Tree of Life and the Healing of Nations” on November 26, part of the Goodson Chapel Art as Evangelism Preaching Series; and “Living in a New Creation with Old Habits: A Lesson from Galatians” on November 30 at Chapel Hill Bible Church.

Richard Lischer’s short essay on the pastoral ministry, “Odd Job,” was included in Best Christian Writing 2006 edited by John Wilson. It appeared earlier in Christian Century. He also published two sermons in The Minister’s Manual : “The Heart of a Heartless World,” and “The River. In Memory of Flannery O'Connor.”

Randy L. Maddox gave the keynote lecture “The Wesleyan Message of Holistic Salvation: Dimensions for Inculturation” at the Charles Wesley Society annual meeting, in Freudenstadt, Germany, September 30. In Reutlingen, Germany, he spoke October 4 on “Reclaiming God’s Mission of Holistic Salvation: Continuing a Wesleyan Agenda” at Evangelische-Methodistische Seminary.

He delivered the keynote address, “Wesleyan Marks of Effective Ministerial Leadership,” on October 6 at the Making Connections Initiative Convocation at Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington, D.C., and spoke November 3 on “Wesleyan Approaches to Health and Healing: A Precedent for the Contemporary Faith/Health Dialogue,” for the Theology and Medicine Program at Duke Divinity School.

L. Edward Phillips recently published “Open Hearts and Closed Minds: United Methodist Attitudes toward the Open Communion Table” in Liturgy, and “Interfaith Center Reunion at University of Tennessee at Martin” for the United Methodist Reporter, Memphis Conference Edition, October 14.

At While Plains United Methodist Church in Cary, N.C., Phillips gave the Wesley Forum presentation, “The Holy Mystery of Holy Communion,” on November 13. He was convener of the January 5-8 annual meeting of the Early Liturgy Seminar for the North American Academy of Liturgy in San Diego, Calif.

Thea Portier-Young contributed “Entering into Lamentations” to Teaching the Bible: Practical Strategies for Classroom Instruction and published “Tongues and Cymbals: Contextualizing 1 Corinthians 13:1” in the fall issue of Biblical Theology Bulletin 3. She spoke twice at Holy Family Catholic Church in Hillsborough, N.C.: she presented “Biblical Peacemaking” on September 28 and “Stewards of Creation: Biblical Perspective on Environmental Stewardship” on November 9.

William Kellon Quick preached Oct. 23 for the 185th anniversary celebration of First United Methodist Church in Mt. Clemens, Mich. He delivered the keynote address for the district laity and clergy leadership training at St. Luke’s U.M.C. in Goldsboro, N.C., in November. On Thanksgiving Eve, for the 31st consecutive year, he addressed the Downtown Detroit Rotary Club. He preached to the United Methodist Men in the Detroit Conference during their annual Lay Rally in October at First U.M.C. in Port Huron, Mich. In addition, he is mentoring 10 student pastors during the current academic year at the divinity school.


Storey

Peter Storey helped present a report to the Commission of Review on Theological Education at the 2005 Conference of the Methodist Church of Southern Africa (MCSA). The report resulted in a decision to relocate John Wesley College, which has a close relationship with Duke Divinity School, to Pietermaritzburg as a new seminary linked to the University of Kwa- Zulu/Natal. In October he preached the opening sermon at the SHADE Jamboree, an international gathering of women from many countries in Africa, all engaged in the struggle against HIV/Aids. His book And Are We Yet Alive – Revisioning Our Wesleyan Heritage in the New Southern Africa is being used as a study book in the MCSA.


Verhey

Allen Verhey published “The Cultural Geography of Cloning” in Christian Reflection: Cloning and “What Makes Christian Bioethics Christian? Bible, Story, and Communal Discernment” in Christian Bioethics in December. He also wrote the essay “Ethics” for the Dictionary for Theological Interpretation of the Bible.

Verhey delivered the Nils Lund Lectures at North Park University on September 22. The titles were, “’Useful … for Training in Righteousness’: The Bible and Christian Ethics” and “Nature and Altering It: The Bible and Ecology.” As a participant in the North Park Symposium on the Theological Interpretation of Scripture, September 23-24, he gave the lecture “Health and Healing in Memory of Jesus.” At the National Institute of Environmental Health Services conference in Research Triangle, N.C., Verhey spoke on “Stem Cell Research: A Protestant Perspective: Looking for Middle Ground,” October 26.

Geoffrey Wainwright attended the funeral of Pope John Paul II as a representative of the World Methodist Council in April. In May he gave three addresses at the 120th Anniversary of the Methodist Church in Singapore. In June he was in Korea as one of the two principal speakers, with Dr. Karen Westerfield Tucker, at an International Symposium to inaugurate a Graduate School of Practical Theology founded by Dr. Joon-Kwan Un, a Duke Master of Theology.

Wainwright gave the inaugural lecture “The Holy Spirit, Witness, and Martyrdom” at the first annual colloquium on “The Holy Spirit in the New Millennium” at Duquesne University in July. In August, he took part in the congress of Societas Liturgica, the international association of worship scholars, at Dresden, Germany.

He chaired the final session of the current round of the doctrinal dialogue between the World Methodist Council and the Roman Catholic Church at Klosterneuburg Abbey, near Vienna, in October. The commission’s report on ecclesiology will be presented to the World Methodist Conference in Seoul, Korea, in July 2006.

Wainwright was part of the Methodist delegation on an official visit to the Vatican in December, and in January he gave the keynote address to a conference between Methodist and Orthodox theologians at St. Vladimir's Seminary in New York.

With Karen Westerfield Tucker, Wainwright edited the Oxford History of Christian Worship, which was a main selection for October 2005 in the Book of the Month Club, and in the History Book Club. The volume, which brings together 38 contributors from every inhabited continent and every confessional family, was five years in the making.

Laceye C. Warner spoke November 2 to the United Methodist Council of Bishops at Lake Junaluska, N.C., on “Evangelism: Finding a Common Language,” and November 14-16 on “Sustaining Ministry and Vocation: Christian Practices” at Millsaps College in Jackson, Miss.

Warner presented “Situating the Word: An Evangelistic Theology of Space” on October 8 to the Academy for Evangelism in Theological Education at Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington, D.C.

On November 21, with Lallene Rector, she spoke on “A Psychoanalytic Investigation of Sanctification and Belief in the Conversion of Julia A.J. Foote” to the Wesleyan Studies Group and Person, Culture, and Religion Group for the American Academy of Religion in Philadelphia, Pa.

She published “Redemption and Race: The Evangelistic Ministry of Three Women in Southern Methodism” in the fall issue of Wesleyan Theological Journal and “Saving Women: Re-visioning Contemporary Concepts of Evangelism” in Considering the Great Commission: Evangelism and Mission in the Wesleyan Spirit, edited by W. Stephen Gunter and Elaine Robinson.

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