Stress and Mental Health

Mental Health Care and the Church

The North Carolina Council of Churches publishes Acts of Faith, a series of lectionary-based worship aids focusing on themes of social justice in North Carolina.

The North Carolina Council of Churches publishes Acts of Faith, a series of lectionary-based worship aids focusing on themes of social justice in North Carolina. The guide for September 19 (Proper 20) is titled “A Balm in Gilead”: Mental Health Care and The Church.

“Worry Isn’t Work”

I really liked this blog post from Dan Pallotta, on the Harvard Business Review site.


I really liked this blog post from Dan Pallotta, on the Harvard Business Review site. He writes:

Many of us have grown up thinking that if we are properly self-punishing then we are somehow being responsible... We don’t correlate our sense of responsibility with what we are actually producing. We correlate it with how hard we are being on ourselves. Thus anything that’s fun cannot possibly be work, and everything that’s unpleasant is.
Tags - Connection: 

There is Endless Potential in the Clay

When I was a student at Duke Divinity School, I considered becoming an archaeologist.

Note: This is the tenth post in a 10-part series, drawn from Connecting the Mind, Body and Spirit: Reflections on Health, produced by the Clergy Health Initiative and distributed at the 2010 United Methodist Annual Conferences in North Carolina.  Each reflection is tied to the lectionary.

September 5, 2010
Jeremiah 18:1-11, Psalm 139 • Just like the clay in the potter’s hand, so are you in my hand.

Clergy Health Takes Center Stage

When the New York Times covers an issue, heads turn. And as a result, the media — and the country — now is taking a closer look at the rising concern over clergy health.

Last week, Times reporter Paul Vitello published a front-page article, Taking a Break from the Lord’s Work.  In it, he highlights the effects that stress and round-the-clock job responsibilities can have on clergy.  Without support, some burn out and leave the church, but many others struggle to maintain balance, seemingly alone.  The challenge then for the church, and for congregations everywhere is to find ways to alleviate the stress.

What's Vacation For?

Recently I went online to rent a beach house for a week in August. The place I prefer to go is one I’ve visited many times over a span of more than twenty years.

Recently I went online to rent a beach house for a week in August. The place I prefer to go is one I’ve visited many times over a span of more than twenty years. What struck me as I checked realtor websites for rental options this year were the selling points listed for the various properties. Location, of course, is always paramount, beach-front still at a premium.

Coaching from the Pews: Laity’s Role in Improving Clergy Health

Last week, I and several colleagues from the Clergy Health Initiative attended the United Methodist Annual Conferences in Greenville and Lake Junaluska, N.C.

Last week, I and several colleagues from the Clergy Health Initiative attended the United Methodist Annual Conferences in Greenville and Lake Junaluska, N.C. Our primary purpose in going was to share information about the Clergy Health Initiative – our research findings and future plans for introducing a suite of interventions to improve the health of pastors statewide. 

What We Know

Many of you have already seen it, but in case you haven't: the current issue of Circuit Rider (May/June/July 2010) features three articles on Clergy Health.


Many of you have already seen it, but in case you haven’t: the current issue of Circuit Rider (May/June/July 2010) features three articles on Clergy Health.

Melissa Rudolph writes on the physical health challenges of United Methodist clergy, and gives an overview of the efforts of general boards and different Annual Conferences to meet the challenge. 

The Problem of Living in Isolation

Humans are created to exist in community, not in solitude...


Have you ever wished you could get away from it all?

Perhaps it has been one of those noisy, difficult days when everything has consumed more energy than it ought, when people have been uncooperative and dilemmas resistant to resolution.  Where would your getaway place be? Some would name the beach or the mountains, others an art gallery or quiet restaurant. Yours?

Tags - Connection: 

Clergy as Concierge: Is "At Your Service" The Best Response?

It takes both the pastor and the congregation to create the unrealistic expectations of 24/7 availability that leave clergy stressed and congregants co-dependent.

Faith & Leadership had an article last week by the Rev. Nelson Granade on the pastor as congregational concierge. It's a wonderful reflection, notable in its insight that it takes both the pastor and the congregation to create the sometimes unrealistic expectations of 24/7 availability that leave clergy stressed, exhausted, and resentful, and their congregants co-dependent.

Time Management: Tools for Mental Health

Wow! There are plenty of people devising software and gadgets to help other people organize their time...

Wow!  There are plenty of people devising software and gadgets to help other people organize their time. This is a topic that could fill many posts – there are whole blogs devoted to the subject – but below are some suggestions that I’ve found useful (and a few I plan to try).
 
Prioritize. "Do-lists" only work if they really help you organize, as opposed to totally overwhelming you with how much you have to accomplish.  I found a simple tool for helping prioritize tasks on Slideshare that involves assigning tasks to a spot on a four-box grid.  The point is to focus on fewer, high-impact tasks, and only tackle one task at a time.

Pages