Reflections

Freedom from Infirmity

In his woodcut, “Pilgrim’s Progress,” the artist Robert Hodgell depicts a man bent over, not unlike the woman in today’s scripture from Luke.

Note: This is the eighth post in a 10-part series, drawn from Connecting the Mind, Body and Spirit: Reflections on Health, produced by the Clergy Health Initiative and distributed at the 2010 United Methodist Annual Conferences in North Carolina.  Each reflection is tied to the lectionary; we will publish each reflection a week in advance of the Sunday to which it is tied.

August 22, 2010
Luke 13:10-17 • When he laid his hands on her, immediately she stood up straight and began praising God.

The Contest of Faith and the Christian Athlete

As a teacher of early Christian history, I often hear students who have an introductory knowledge of the early Church pose two criticisms of the Church Fathers.

Note: This is the seventh post in a 10-part series, drawn from Connecting the Mind, Body and Spirit: Reflections on Health, produced by the Clergy Health Initiative and distributed at the 2010 United Methodist Annual Conferences in North Carolina.  Each reflection is tied to the lectionary; we will publish each reflection a week in advance of the Sunday to which it is tied.

August 15, 2010
Hebrews 11:29-12:2 • Let us run with perseverance the race that is set before us.

Strength in Numbers

There are many versions of Christianity that hold the faith to be merely a matter of belief.

Note: This is the sixth post in a 10-part series, drawn from Connecting the Mind, Body and Spirit: Reflections on Health, produced by the Clergy Health Initiative and distributed at the 2010 United Methodist Annual Conferences in North Carolina.  Each reflection is tied to the lectionary; we will publish each reflection a week in advance of the Sunday to which it is tied.

August 8, 2010
Luke 12:32-40 • Sell your possessions, and give alms.

Being Rich Toward God

One word holds together the assigned gospel, epistle, and Old Testament lessons for this week: greed – the unhealthy, human tendency to trust primarily in ourselves and what we can acquire rather than putting our trust in God.

Note: This is the fifth post in a 10-part series, drawn from Connecting the Mind, Body and Spirit: Reflections on Health, produced by the Clergy Health Initiative and distributed at the 2010 United Methodist Annual Conferences in North Carolina.  Each reflection is tied to the lectionary; we will publish each reflection a week in advance of the Sunday to which it is tied.

August 1, 2010
Hosea 11:1-11, Colossians 3:1-11, Luke 12:13-21 • Put t
o death, therefore, whatever in you is earthly.

The Abundant Life of Bread

We worship a God who loves bread. This should not be surprising to us, particularly if we recognize that in the sharing of bread we become companions to one another.

Note: This is the fourth post in a 10-part series, drawn from Connecting the Mind, Body and Spirit: Reflections on Health, produced by the Clergy Health Initiative and distributed at the 2010 United Methodist Annual Conferences in North Carolina.  Each reflection is tied to the lectionary; we will publish each reflection a week in advance of the Sunday to which it is tied.

July 25, 2010
Luke 11:1-13 • Give us each day our daily bread.

Beyond the Gospel of Us

Would our pews be emptier if we talked more about God and less about what God can do for us?

Note: This is the third post in a 10-part series, drawn from Connecting the Mind, Body and Spirit: Reflections on Health, produced by the Clergy Health Initiative and distributed at the 2010 United Methodist Annual Conferences in North Carolina.  Each reflection is tied to the lectionary; we will publish each reflection a week in advance of the Sunday to which it is tied.

July 18, 2010
Colossians 1:15-28 • He himself is before all things, and in him all things hold together.

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Have They Fruit?

"Have they fruit?” John Wesley asked of his would-be preachers. Could those who were seeking ordination show anything for their service?

Note: This is the second post in a 10-part series, drawn from Connecting the Mind, Body and Spirit: Reflections on Health, produced by the Clergy Health Initiative and distributed at the 2010 United Methodist Annual Conferences in North Carolina.  Each reflection is tied to the lectionary; we will publish each reflection a week in advance of the Sunday to which it is tied.

The Simple Salve

Note: This is the first post in a 10-part series, drawn from Connecting the Mind, Body and Spirit: Reflections on Health, produced by the Clergy Health Initiative and distributed at the 2010 United Methodist Annual Conferences in North Carolina.  Each reflection is tied to the lectionary; we will publish each reflection a week in advance of the Sunday to which it is tied. 


July 4, 2010
2 Kings 5:1-14 • Go, wash in the Jordan seven times, and your flesh shall be restored and you shall be clean.

The Rev. Grace Hackney: Ramblings of A Pastor in Transition

I am moving this year, after serving at Cedar Grove United Methodist Church for seven years. Cedar Grove was my first appointment, so this is my first move.

This post is one of two on itinerancy transitions - the other is from the congregant's point of view.

I am moving this year, after serving at Cedar Grove United Methodist Church for seven years.  Cedar Grove was my first appointment, so this is my first move. I initiated the move, after long and careful discernment. I did not want this move to be my idea, but rather, God’s desire. I needed to know that I was not merely leaving, but rather, that God was calling me to a new place of ministry.

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Coherence: Making Sense of Life (and Death)

Making things coherent means imbuing them with meaning - weaving each new experience into our personal narratives, insights, or spiritual sensibility.

The Rev. W. Joseph Mann kicked off this series of meditations on the Leading Causes of Life, Gary Gunderson and Larry Pray's fresh look at what makes life worth living. We’ve touched on Hope and Blessing.  Here's the next installment – Coherence.

Making things coherent means imbuing them with meaning - weaving each new experience into our personal narratives, insights, or spiritual sensibility. 

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