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Divinity Online Edition - Fall 2006

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Theology & Medicine Hosts National Conference

More than 450 pastors, chaplains, congregational nurses, physicians and lay health ministry educators attended Formation, Flourishing, and Friendship, sponsored the Theology & Medicine at Duke Divinity School prior to the Health Ministries Association 17th annual gathering in June.

More than 450 pastors, chaplains, congregational nurses, physicians and lay health ministry educators attended Formation, Flourishing, and Friendship, sponsored by Theology & Medicine at Duke Divinity School prior to the Health Ministries Association 17th annual gathering in June.

Bishop Will Willimon of the North Alabama Conference of the United Methodist Church delivered the keynote for Formation, Flourishing, and Friendship with God, a pre-conference sponsored by Theology and Medicine at Duke Divinity School.

The event preceded the Health Ministries Association 17th Annual National Conference, June 21-25, 2006.

The June 21 worship celebration in Goodson Chapel was led by Bishop Kenneth L. Carder, professor of the practice of pastoral formation, whose message was “It Takes a Community.”

Panel discussions included Theology and Health with Joel Shuman and Stanley Hauerwas; Scriptural Embodiment with Allen Verhey and Ellen Davis; Health and Liturgical Practices with Therese Lysaught and L. Gregory Jones; and Religion and Health Research with Farr Curlin, Dan Hall and Harold Koenig.

Dr. Keith G. Meador, director of Theology and Medicine, said the conference emphasized the significance of formation in practices of caring within a faith community as theologically interpreted through human flourishing and friendship with God.

Film Series on Christians & Nazism

How should Christians live out their faith when the culture of their time is at odds with their beliefs? What kind of responsibility do Christians have for the Jewish people?

Duke Divinity School will explore these questions and others during “Christian Responses to Nazism and the Holocaust,” a free, public film series organized by Stephen Chapman, assistant professor of Old Testament.

“There is no expiration date on the question of what it means to live out the Christian faith within a particular time and place,” says Chapman.

A divinity school faculty member will lead discussion after each 7 p.m. screening. The films include “Bonhoeffer” on Sept. 20, hosted by Stanley Hauerwas, Gilbert T. Rowe professor of theological ethics; “Theologians under Hitler” on Oct. 18, hosted by J. Kameron Carter, assistant professor of theology and black church studies; “Weapons of the Spirit” on Nov. 8, hosted by Samuel Wells, dean of Duke Chapel and research professor of Christian ethics; and conclude with “Sophie Scholl: The Final Days” on Nov. 29, hosted by Teresa Berger, professor of ecumenical theology.

For more information, contact Chapman at (919) 660-3408.

Thriving Rural Communities

Duke Divinity School and The Duke Endowment are collaborating with the N.C. and Western N.C. Conferences of the United Methodist Church to foster strong rural churches and communities in North Carolina.

More than 450 pastors, chaplains, congregational nurses, physicians and lay health ministry educators attended Formation, Flourishing, and Friendship, sponsored the Theology & Medicine at Duke Divinity School prior to the Health Ministries Association 17th annual gathering in June.

Thriving Rural Communities will create six model United Methodist Church programs aimed at attracting strong clergy to the rural church. Training and support for those and other leaders in rural settings will be provided, with attention to replicating the program's successes at other churches across the state.

Six students will receive divinity scholarships and serve internships in the model churches. In return, they will be asked to serve in rural congregations for at least five to eight years after graduation.

Social and economic challenges ranging from mill closings to shrinking populations have sapped the strength of many rural faith communities, said Dean L. Gregory Jones. Creative strategies are needed if churches are to remain vital in these areas.

For more information about Thriving Rural Communities, contact John James, (919) 660-3482.


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