Day 4: Incarnation

Day 4: Incarnation

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Today we celebrated Christ’s incarnation by diving into our second Arts Village workshops, using our bodies to create and live more fully into the people God has created us to be.

At a Glance

Theme

Incarnation

Faculty Speaker

Dr. Warren Smith, Associate Professor of Historical Theology

Lectionary Texts

Exodus 3:1-15; Philippians 2:5-11; Luke 2:1-20; John 1:1-18

Reflections on the Lecture

Student Anna W. works on a mural during Arts VillageIn this morning’s plenary, Dr. Smith invited us to consider the significance and relevance of the incarnation on our theology and practice. We began by exploring the relationship of God the Father to God the Son, the Logos, the one who spoke creation into being. Dr. Smith reminded us that both are eternal, but that in taking on human flesh, the Son willingly limited himself to become limited to time and space. Fully God and fully human, Jesus enabled the redemption of human flesh that had become turned in upon itself and its own desires. Through Jesus’ perfect life and sinless death, humanity is able to see God rightly again and live as God intended for us.

Quotes

When we love things inappropriately or love the wrong things, we can make our own lives miserable. When we love God first, we can love other things rightly.” — Dr. Smith during morning plenary

God became man so that we might become God.’” — Dr. Smith, quoting the 4th century theologian Athanasius

Incarnation. Kenosis. Imitation. Let’s remember these by an acronym. We’ll call it ‘iki.’” — Dr. Richard B. Hays on what Philippians 2:1-11 models for us

Other Activities

Today we celebrated Christ’s incarnation by diving into our second Arts Village workshops, using our bodies to create and live more fully into the people God has created us to be. In the afternoon, the student and staff praise band led a Spirit-filled “jam session” during free time before leading us in worship last night. We were blessed to have the Rev. Dr. Richard B. Hays, professor of New Testament and Dean-elect of Duke Divinity School, preaching and our own Rev. Andrew Thompson celebrating the Eucharist.

Looking Ahead

Tomorrow our doxology will hit a minor note as we move toward the theme of Christ’s passion.  Following morning prayer, the Rev. Dr. Edgardo Colón-Emeric will teach our morning plenary.  In the afternoon, students will have the opportunity to explore their first prayer practice workshops in different Christian traditions.  We look forward to a contemplative evening service led by the Rev. Nathan Kirkpatrick, Managing Director of Leadership Education at Duke Divinity School.

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