November 2009

It is the week of Christ the King. This past Sunday marked the first in Advent. The last few days have found me ruminating on the dialogue between Pilate and Jesus found in John’s Gospel 18:33b-37.

By Enuma Okoro, D’03
Author and Retreat Director
Raleigh, N.C.

Let me be frank: Everyone should see the movie "Precious."

By Amey Victoria Adkins, D’09
Research Assistant, Black Church Studies
Duke Divinity School

Let me be frank: Everyone should see the movie Precious.

At the beginning of a seminary career, one of the best people to be introduced to is Anna Pauline “Pauli” Murray.

By Dr. Willie James Jennings
Associate Professor of Theology and
Black Church Studies
Duke Divinity School

In honor of Pauli Murray’s birthday this week (November 20), we are sharing the following reflections as well as local (Durham) information on activities honoring the occasion. Happy Birthday, Pauli!

At the beginning of a seminary career, one of the best people to be introduced to is Anna Pauline “Pauli” Murray.

Dr. Joy J. Moore
Associate Dean for Black Church Studies and Church Relations
Duke Divinity School

As a key figure in our theological lineage, we invite you to join us in supporting and attending local Durham events that honor the legacy and accomplishments of Pauli Murray, sponsored by Duke University and the Pauli Murray Project. Happy Birthday, Pauli!!

Houston Baker discussed the power of the Harlem Renaissance and black artistic expression as the “mastery of form and the deformation of mastery.“ By this phrase Baker refers to the power of black artists to master the forms of European artistic expression and then turn them inside out to re-express notions of human freedom that were denied by the very same European forms that sought to oppress and enslave them

By Dr. Brian Bantum, Divinity ’03
Assistant Professor of Theology
Seattle Pacific University

Houston Baker discussed the power of the Harlem Renaissance and black artistic expression as the “mastery of form and the deformation of mastery.“ By this phrase Baker refers to the power of black artists to master the forms of European artistic expression and then turn them inside out to re-express notions of human freedom that were denied by the very same European forms that sought to oppress and enslave them.

Check out When the Spirit says sing on Faith & Leadership about the a cappella ensemble Sweet Honey in the Rock, where the group reflects on the deep African-American traditions that lace their songs and their spirits.

Dr. Joy J. Moore
Associate Dean for Black Church Studies and Church Relations
Duke Divinity School