Dean’s Office

Visit by Documentary Filmmakers

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Rudy and Shirley Nelson present "Precarious Peace: God and Guatemala."

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On April 8-9, Duke Divinity School will host documentary filmmakers Rudy and Shirley Nelson. On April 8 at 8 p.m. they will present a showing of their film, "Precarious Peace: God and Guatemala." The film explores questions on what it takes to end a war and ensure peace.

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Clark Lecture 2: ‘Apocryphal Fragments and Our Images of Early Christianity’ with Tobias Nicklas

Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 8:30am to 9:45am
0016 Westbrook Building
Duke Divinity School at events@div.duke.edu

Duke Divinity School will host the second and final lecture of the 2014 Kenneth W. Clark Lecture Series featuring Tobias Nicklas speaking on “Apocryphal Fragments and Our Images of Early Christianity.”

Nicklas is the professor of exegesis and hermeneutics of the New Testament at the University of Regensburg in Germany and honorary research associate of the universities of Pretoria and Bloemfontein, both in South Africa. He previously was professor of New Testament at Radboud University of Nijmegen in the Netherlands.

The professor is an editor and co-editor in several international projects including Novum Testamentum Patristicum (a series of commentaries on ancient interpretations of the New Testament), the Commentaries on Apocryphal Literature, and the series Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament. He also serves on the editorial board of the journal New Testament Studies.

Nicklas has authored and edited many books, including Gospel Fragments (Oxford, 2009) and Das Petrusevangelium und die Petrusapokalypse (Berlin 2004). His book Jewish or Christian? Second-Century Perspectives on the “Parting of the Ways” (Tübingen: Mohr) will be published this summer. Together with Thomas J. Kraus, he has co-edited several books developing a new perspective on New Testament textual history. His Clark lectures will focus on subjects covered in these books.

More about 2014 Kenneth Clark Lectures

Clark Lecture 1: ‘New Testament Manuscripts: Every Fragment Tells a Story’ with Tobias Nicklas

Tuesday, April 8, 2014 - 12:20pm to 1:30pm
0016 Westbrook Building
Duke Divinity School at events@div.duke.edu

Duke Divinity School will host the 2014 Kenneth W. Clark Lecture Series featuring Tobias Nicklas, professor of exegesis and hermeneutics of the New Testament at the University of Regensburg in Germany, lecturing on ancient Christian manuscripts and how they can be connected to different aspects of Christian history.

This first lecture in this year’s lecture series will be on “New Testament Manuscripts: Every Fragment Tells a Story.”

His second and final lecture, "Apocryphal Fragments and Our Images of Early Christianity," will be April 9 from 8:30 to 9:45 a.m. Both lectures will be in 0016 Westbrook Building of the Divinity School.

Nicklas is also an honorary research associate of the universities of Pretoria and Bloemfontein, both in South Africa. He previously was professor of New Testament at Radboud University of Nijmegen in the Netherlands.

The professor is an editor and co-editor in several international projects including Novum Testamentum Patristicum (a series of commentaries on ancient interpretations of the New Testament), the Commentaries on Apocryphal Literature, and the series Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament. He also serves on the editorial board of the journal New Testament Studies.

Nicklas has authored and edited many books, including Gospel Fragments (Oxford, 2009) and Das Petrusevangelium und die Petrusapokalypse (Berlin 2004). His book Jewish or Christian? Second-Century Perspectives on the “Parting of the Ways” (Tübingen: Mohr) will be published this summer. Together with Thomas J. Kraus, he has co-edited several books developing a new perspective on New Testament textual history. His Clark lectures will focus on subjects covered in these books.

More information about the 2014 Kenneth Clark Lectures

Funeral Service for Professor Allen Verhey

Tuesday, March 4, 2014 - 4:00pm
Duke Chapel
Cathy Germanowski (cgermanowski@div.duke.edu)

There will be a funeral service for Allen Verhey, Robert Earl Cushman Professor of Christian Theology at Duke Divinity School, who died Feb. 26 at his home in Durham, N.C. The service at Duke Chapel is open to the public. The service was originally scheduled for March 3, but was postponed due to inclement weather.

Visitation for Professor Allen Verhey

Sunday, March 2, 2014 - 2:00pm to 5:00pm
First Presbyterian Church in Durham, N.C.
Cathy Germanowski (cgermanowski@div.duke.edu)

Friends will be received by the family at a visitation for Duke Divinity School Professor Allen Verhey at First Presbyterian Church, 305 E. Main St. in Durham, N.C. The visitation is open to the public.

Verhey, the Robert Earl Cushman Professor of Christian Theology, died Feb. 26 at his home in Durham.

--POSTPONED until March 4-- Funeral Service for Professor Allen Verhey

Monday, March 3, 2014 - 4:00pm
Duke Chapel
Cathy Germanowski (cgermanowski@div.duke.edu)

The funeral service for Allen Verhey, Robert Earl Cushman Professor of Christian Theology at Duke Divinity School, has been postponed until Tuesday, March 4. Verhey died Feb. 26 at his home in Durham, N.C. The service at Duke Chapel will be open to the public.

Carrie Newcomer Concert

Friday, February 21, 2014

Dean's Songwriters Series continues with visit from singer-songwriter on Feb. 26.

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‘Paul through Ancient and Modern Eyes’ Mini-Conference (Part 2)

Friday, March 28, 2014 - 1:00pm to 5:00pm
0014 Westbrook Building
Becka Breibart-White, becka.breibart-white@div.duke.edu

Duke Divinity School will host the second and final day of a mini-conference on “Paul through Ancient and Modern Eyes” to celebrate and discuss the work of scholars Patout Burns and Robin Jensen on Paul in early Christianity.

The second day of the free conference will begin with a presentation, “Ancient and Modern Readers of Romans,” by Richard Hays, dean and George Washington Ivey Professor of New Testament, and Douglas Campbell, associate professor of New Testament, both of the Divinity School. It will be followed by a response by Burns and a question and answer session.

The March 27-28 conference will conclude with a presentation, “Romans and Church History” with David Fink, assistant professor of religion at Furman University; Robert Wilken, professor of the history of Christianity at the University of Virginia, and Sujin Pak, assistant research professor of the history of Christianity and associate dean for academic programs, and Warren Smith, associate professor of historical theology, both of the Divinity School.

Divinity School faculty, staff and students are invited to attend the conference. No registration is required.

More information on the first day’s events

‘Paul through Ancient and Modern Eyes’ Mini-Conference (Part 1)

Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 7:00pm to 8:45pm
0012 Westbrook Building
Becka Breibart-White, becka.breibart-white@div.duke.edu

Duke Divinity School will host a two-day mini-conference on “Paul through Ancient and Modern Eyes” to celebrate and discuss the work of scholars Patout Burns and Robin Jensen on Paul in early Christianity.

The first day of the free conference will involve a presentation by Jensen, professor of the history of Christian art and worship at Vanderbilt University, from 7 to 8:30 p.m.

The presentation will include a response from Susan Eastman, associate professor of the practice of Bible and Christian formation, and director of the Doctor of Theology program at Duke Divinity School. It will conclude with a question and answer session.

The second day of the March 27-28 event will involve a presentation by Burns, professor of Christian thought at Washington University in St. Louis, and other events.

Divinity School faculty, staff and students are invited to attend the mini-conference. No registration is required.

More information on the second day’s events

Symposium on 'The Unintended Reformation' with Brad Gregory

Friday, February 28, 2014 - 2:00pm to 5:00pm
0012 Westbrook Building
cgermanowski@div.duke.edu or (919) 660-3434

Duke Divinity School will co-sponsor a symposium, “The Unintended Reformation,” led by Brad S. Gregory, Dorothy G. Griffin Professor of Early Modern European History at the University of Notre Dame.

The symposium is about Gregory's book, The Unintended Reformation: How a Religious Revolution Secularized Society and will include conversation with Russ Leo, assistant professor of English at Princeton University.

Gregory welcomes questions in advance of this event by email.

The Duke's Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies and the Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies are also sponsoring the event.

Register or more information

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